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the united nations vote whether to recognize the palestinian state. recognizing a palestinian state but the united states, israel and others are not celebrating. we will get the details ahead. the senate is working to change the law. the law that lets cops and the feds read our e-mails. they can just read them if the messages are more than six months old. a change coming that could affect all privacy. i am still on air today because my staff didn't win the record $588 million powerball jackpot. the deal was, if they won, obviously they were thought coming to work and the stage manager was going to anchor and i was going to hang out on their boat. but, no, there are two winners, obviously we hate them. we will talk about them unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." >> first from fox at 3:00, the united nations general assembly hold a historic vote any moment on recognizing an independent palestinian state. it is expected to pass overwhelmingly despite opposition from the united states and israel which are in a vast majority of the u.n.'s 193 members. this measure
on the heels of a successful palestinian bid at the united nations to gain nonmember observer state status. secretary of state hillary clinton calling the move a setback. >> let me reiterate that this administration, like previous administrations, has been very clear with israel, that these activities that back the cause of a negotiated peace. we all need to work together to find a path forward in negotiations that can finally deliver on a two-state solution. that must remain our goal. >> kelly: so what does it mean for the stalled israeli-palestinian peace talks, john bolton weighs in just ahead. >> jamie: also, a top al-qaeda terrorist is now in custody. big news, we'll tell you where he was captured and why his arrest is so significant. >> kelly: plus, breaking news out of sear yeah, the country's internet service is back on as fighting begins between troops and rebels. we're live in the the middle east. >> jamie: and also, a defiant move out of north korea. the rogue nation's latest plan to launch yet another long range rocket. [ abdul-rashid ] i've been working since i was about 16. y
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
excited but there is no proof it's for real. while in new york, at the united nations a different kind of history is made. >> 138. >> palestinians celebrate after the united nations general assembly votes overwhelmingly for nonmember status des price strong u.s. and israeli opposition, palestinian authority prime minister sa lem fay yesterday is here with us to react today. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. president obama took the show on road today. who are not impressed by the administration's opening budget officer. -- offer. joining me is kristen welker, and luke russert. first to you, the calculus in going to the suburbs of philadelphia, kristen, clearly he feels that the political play right now is better than the inside game that didn't work for him during the super committee negotiations, but can that backfire? >> right now the president feels as though he has a fair amount of leverage having won re-election so he's trying to build momentum on the road. remember, this is a tactic that worked for him during the payroll tax cut fight when he went out, took his ca
to the united nations general assembly, calling for a vote, getting recognized ace nonmember state, he's -- he's skirting the peace process. of course he says there is no peace process. but he certainly upsetting thes and the americans a great deal by doing this. as you say for the palestinians, it is a major step forward in the international -- on the international stage but appears to be at this moment more symbolic unless they join other u.n. agencies and take action ge against israel. >> chuck schumer starting the process to start an amendment on the defense appropriations act which would take away the palestinians' money -- the palestinians on the west bank, not hamas, but the west bank have had the benefit of some american economic aid because of improvements that their prime minister fayed has achieved and cracked down on corruption, other reforms in the last couple of years, so they do risk that. i'm not sure it would go through but it is one of those things that can rocket through the u.s. congress. >> reporter: there is that. there is that threat of sanctions if they do it. israel sa
opposed, 9. abstained, 41. >> the floor is to the secretary general of the united nations. >> mr. president, excellencies, ladies and gentleman, an important vote has taken place today in the general assembly. the decision [indiscernible] i stand ready to fulfill my role and report to this assembly, as requested in the resolution. my question has been consistent. the palestinians have a right to their own independent state. israel has the right to live in peace and security with its neighbors. there is no substitute for negotiations. today's vote underscores the urgency of meaningful negotiations. we must give a do impetus to ensure an independent democratic state of palestine lives with a secure state of israel. i urge the parties to renew their commitment for negotiating peace. i count on all to act responsibly, preserve your treatment in state building under the leadership of president abbas and the prime minister. thank you. [applause] >> i think the secretary-general of the united nations for a statement. >> we will break away from the united nations where they have approved
is at it again. republicans in the senate reject a united nations treaty to ban discrimination against the disabled. they say it would allow u.n. officials to come into this country and force home-schooled children into government-run, that is public schools. senator john kerry joins us to cut through the nonsense. >>> also tonight, the simpson's mr. burns gives usña rich man' look at the fiscal cliff. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver, he'll drive you over a cliff. >> that's an aside show and this is "hardball," the place for politics. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> never too early for pollst
with respect to united nations convention on this they are fairly outrageous. and what they're looking for, at the end of the day is respect, respect out the table and respect for who they are and what they are doing. and semi-we can define the means to bring these two solitudes together because at the end of the day any conflicts, whether it's kinetic or otherwise, that adversely affects the sultry to that part of the world will have a fundamentally adverse impact on the global economy spent it's doing it now with china and japan. that's interesting, as you've got two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises a fundamental question, and it's of ending this myth that economics draws people closer together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?." during the cold war, what was interesting is you can have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and if two and if to implement you it's about 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment figuring out how to communicate and how to coordinate, how to deal with escalation, how do you talk
relations committee, 13-6. i think if you took a vote to abolish the united nations, you would have, unfortunately, we're wrapped up in this. ensuring people with disabilities are afforded the same rights and opportunities as everyone else. we cannot abandon our post. it will send a terrible signal to the world that we're not up to this and i think that we have that moral issue that i think people understand, and that's why we're grateful that so many republicans have joined with so many democrats and really what should be a nonpartisan issue. it could send a terrible signal to the world we're mired in partisan political gridlock and that's not what this has been all about. >> i look at the divide. john mccain. mike lee and pat toomey who are against this. >> i think opponents of the treaty that gives the u.n. no authority over the united states or our citizens. it requires no new legislation. it requires no change in existing legislation. it doesn't require a single cent in appropriations to support its enactment. a leadership role worldwide in this important human rights area. to
, the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highways, $538 billion in aviation, $266 billion in transit and yet the amtrak which was created in 1971, has received a small fraction of that funding at $41 billion. when you consider that an compared to the oil and gas industry which has received roughly $41 billion in federal subsidies with more than half of those subsidies available to the energy sector, we have -- to bring that together we spend more and when you're with the oil and gas and energy companies and their industries than we have spent an entire in the entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the position of high-speed rail, one of those alternatives and now it may only achieves speeds achieve speeds of 83 miles per hour. surely that is significantly better than the long delays of sprawling major interstate systems that we have. this committee should continue the the to the role is a very sad to facilitate critical of the structure and the continuation of one of america's greate
at the united nations to upgrade the palestinian authority status to nonmember observer state, full statehood still may be an allusive dream. with me to talk about his people's hopes and difficulties is palestinian prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the
nations would be able to tell people in the united states how to deal with his daughter isabella and some republicans were citing that as a reason for rejecting the treaty. what do you say in. >> i have great respect for both rick and his wife and their daughter and family, he's a strong family man. he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero -- i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. there is no ability to go to court. there is not one requirement of a change in american law. and there is no way to tell an american parent anything. now, that is according to our supreme court of the united states. that's according to the language in the treaty itself. and this is a treaty that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornbur
through 2012 from the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highway. 538 billion in aviation. 266 billion in transit. yet, amtrak, which was created in 1971, has received a small fraction of that spending of $41 billion. when you consider that compared to the oil and gas industry, we have spent, to bring that together, we have spent more than one year in the energy industry than we have spent an entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly, there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the vision of high-speed rail, but amtrak services, one of those alternatives. it may only achieve the average of 83 miles per hour, along the nec, and surely that is definitely better than the long delays of major interstate systems that we have. this committee should consider the role to facilitate the development of critical infrastructure and the continuation of one of america's greatest assets, and that is passenger rail. i would like to thank all the witnesses before the committee today. i look forward to hearing your testimony about how
. palestinian leaders predict they are going to score historic win tomorrow when the united nations votes on whether to recognize a palestinian state. analysts expect the vote to pass and by a big majority it would grant palestine only limited understood -- statehood. against the effort it could give palestinians new leverage against israel. mahmoud abbas has said he will not negotiate with israel as long as it keeps expanding settlements in the west bank. and the israeli prime minister has refused to freeze that construction. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is at the united nations tonight. january jonathan explain the u.s. here. >> it boils down to the simple argue that officials believe this will hinder rather than help the peace process between the israelis and palestinians, that it will enable and encourage the palestinians to pursue war crimes charges in other international institutions such as the international criminal court against israeli officials over the actions that they have taken recently in past years in gaza. in the words of the secretary of state hillary
momentum may be building for the latest move by palestinians. to get united nations recognition. david lee miller on what the u.s. intends to do. >> on the streets of ramallah, on the west bank. posters can already be seen exclaiming state of palestine, member of the united nations. before departing for new york, palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas told supporters he is determined to win a u.n. vote, raising the status of palestinians. to nonvoting member state at the world body. thursday's vote in the general assembly requires only a majority of the u.n. 193-member states and cannot be vetoed by the u.s. it was only one year ago that abbas sought full-up membership, only to be rebuffed by a threat of a u.s. veto with a security council. >> trying desperately to prevent that, to delay and threaten us. and now they understand that this is going to happen. they cannot stop it. >> the palestinian authority is frustrated at the lack of peace talks and the expansion of the israeli settlements. today, abbas met with the state department officials but failed to change the u.s.'s positio
their united nations status elevated. what does that mean? does it really do anything for them? basically, it's part of the palestinian effort, going on for decades now, to be an official country. equal in status with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.n. extensively and is our cnn favorite on this topic, is there to really give a little more context as to what they wanted to and what kind of status it would give them and how far up in status it would actually elevate them. richard, tell us what it means. >> okay. first, just to clarify, hamas not really here with the palestinians. the palestinian president abbas is in new york, met with the secretary general last night. yes, this is, as usual with the u.n., words matter. sometimes one letter in a document could be a time bomb. what we have he
and then he ran out. we haven't seen or heard from him since. >>> the united nations general assembly voted thursday to recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state. the news was received with celebration in the west bank, but, palestinians face a harsh reality. their borders are mostly controlled by israel. they have competing governments in the west bank and gaza. what's ahead for palestinians and israelis now? let's bring in nbc correspondent martin fletcher who has covered this region longer than any other journalist in the world. just after the u.n. vote, israel and jewish settlements in the west bank and jerusalem. what does that say about israel's intentions moving forward? >> well, nothing very good, i guess. the reason they did that is that they were very, very angry that the united nations general assembly approved of the palestinians as an observer, nonvoting state. and israel's response was to say that that was a way of getting around, getting out of the peace process. preempting with the negotiations. israel said there was a great pressure on the israeli government to resp
they're troubled by what the united nations ambassador susan rice is telling them. and now the acting cia director has some serious problems as well. president obama pulls out all the stops to keep middle class taxes low, but will congress go along with higher taxes for the rich? plus, a long secret u.s. plan, get this, to explode an atomic bomb on the moon. what were they thinking? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> today we may be at the tipping point for one of the most important decisions president obama needs to make as he begins his second term. on capitol hill republicans including moderate republicans are sending the president a clear warning, don't nominate susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. rice is the current u.s. ambassador to the united nations. she spent a second day meeting with senators trying to explain some of her inaccurate comments she made after the september 11th terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. cnn's senior congressional correspondent dana bash is joining us now from capitol hill with the ver
about her, which means a whole lot didn't get done at the united nations. but beyond that, when benjamin netanyahu gave his speech describing -- it was a very significant speech as head of state -- >> describing why -- megyn: two months ago. >> yeah -- why the survival of his country depends on stopping iran from weaponizing its stock of uranium, he -- she was absent. megyn: here he is at the united nations in september making the case our viewers may remember at this moment. >> i do. megyn: so she didn't show up. >> correct. megyn: why not? >> she was of off at a luncheon meeting of some negotiators -- megyn: well, she was busy. >> this is a head of state, an ally of the united states talking about a highly significant issue. it seems to me that the lunch, if that's what it was, or the meeting if that's what it was, could have waited. megyn: you feel like it was a snub? >> it's not a question of how i feel. i think it was perceived as a snub, and it was -- the fact that she wasn't there was commented on, and i think any diplomat with a pulse would know that it would be commented on. meg
wounded in two days of violence. jonathan hunt is live today at the united nations. the big question is, will president assad stay and fight? will he seek asylum? >>jonathan: the turks and russians, they are saying they are working on what they call "new ideas to bring an end to the ongoing 20--month-old civil war." they have nut given any ideas or details what those ideas might be but it will revolve around whether president assad has decided he going to live and die in syria and die most likely at the hands of the rebels or whether he can be persuaded to say asylum but that has the u.n. secretary-general having misgivings giving a man who has murdered 40,000 of his own people to give him retirement in a safe and friendly country. >> the united nations must not allow any impunity after gross violation of human rights. he must be held accountable and brought to justice>>jonathan: tf the argument is that any kind of solution that would persuade assad to stand down and end the slaughter of all of those syrian civilians might, actually, be worth considering. >>trace: what do we know of the
at the united nations. the world defies the u.s. in a historic vote for palestinians. and huge crowds are gathering in tahrir square after egypt approved a controversial new draft constitution. it's a move that's likely to inflame the political crisis there. we're live in cairo with what it all means for the region. first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. he is in pennsylvania at the toy factory talking fiscal cliff. you're watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. [ emily jo ] derrell comes into starbucks with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring home to him and then just gave him a little bit of help finding his way. ♪ [ laughs ] [ applause ] i love you. i love you, too. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me
at the united nations first to james rosen at the state department and to james nato is taking steps to minimize the amount landing outside of syria. >> that's right, shep. the foreign ministers of the military alliance gathered in brussels today and announced there that they have approved a request made by member state turkey which asked for u.s.-made patriot antimissile batteries to be installed along its southern border syria. the ministry made clear the systems are purely defensive. germany and netherlands are supplying the pac three model as soon as their respective parliaments approve the deal which is expected to come soon. >> when that exactly will happen will depend on a number of practical issues that will be sorted out in the very near future. so i can't give you an exact date but i will tell you that the actual deployment of missiles will take place within weeks. >> hundreds of nato troops will also be deployed to install and operate these antimissile weapons but it doesn't appear right now that they will be u.s. troops, shep. >> shepard: sheriffs clinton was at that meeting in bruss
on during a news conference. >> susan rice has done a great job as our ambassador to the united nations and, of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. i'm very happy he has the opportunity with a second term to make a decision. >> but on capitol hill, tennessee republican senator bob corker spoke with rice wednesday and later warned the president that the job of secretary of state is held to a higher standard than that of other appointees. >>> last night on "hard ball," susan collins talked about her meeting with ambassador rice. she says why she is troubled about rice's comments on the attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya. >> she says that she relied on information that was given to her but it's obvious that she chose to emphasize some aspects and down play others. and, frankly, i think the u.n. ambassador along with the secretary of state should be above politics and that she should have just said, no, i'm not going to go on those shows. it's the wrong issue and the wrong time of year. i've got to maintain my credibility. >> you can catch "hardball" at 5
: susan rice has done a great job as our be ambassador to the united nations. and of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. >> paul: and the secretary of state hillary clinton reacting to talk to president obama may nominate u.n. ambassador susan rice to replace her. rice made the rounds on capitol hill on tuesday in an attempt to ease republican concerns and smooth the way for potential cabinet nomination, just one of the positions that president obama will have to fill on his national security team in his second term. we're back with dan henninger and mary anastasia o'grady and bret stevens joins the panel. is there a case for susan rice as secretary of state. >> senator john mccain and susan ayotte feel they have a case again her in relates to benghazi before the election because susan rice after the incident happened, that the murder of ambassador stevens went on the sunday morning talk shows and said that the demonstrations were related to the islamic video that some kid in california made. and what they want to know is why susan rice, u.n. ambassador, was se
gesture, they're saying it shows the -- that what they're trying to do, going to the united nations for recognition, is definitely trying to preserve the last remnant of hope in the two-state solution. they're saying that the israelis are pretty much sabotaging that plan. >> the fact that the u.n. changed the status from observer entity to observer state, i mean, it's that word state that makes all the difference, right? >> sure, yeah. and it is more than symbolic. for example, this weekend, what was the palestinian authority is changing its letterhead to put the word palestine on its e-mails and its letterheads, that kind of thing. but beyond the symbolism, it doesn't really change any of the facts on the ground. it doesn't do away with the israeli checkpoints, the israeli soldiers or the settlements. what it did do, i think, for the palestinians, was to show that the tide of international opinion is working in their direction. they will not vote by an absolutely massive majority. the israelis found themselves in a minority of mind, as well as the united states and canada, nations
who are saying that in light of the vote at the united nations where the palestinians managed to get that upgraded status, that all of those assurances are null and void, michael. >> all of this pressure that's being put on. israel has been good at ignoring outside pressure on anything. i'm curious about the palestinian side. that u.n. status upgrade does, of course, given the palestinians potential access to a whole raft of u.n. bodies, including the international criminal court. what are the palestinians saying about their options going forward? >> well, the palestinians are saying that all opings are on the table. of course aring the palestinian authority condemned the fact that these housing places were now back on the table, and, of course, they are saying that one of the avenues that they might pursue is the international criminal court, as you said, as a nonmember observer state in the u.n. general assembly. they have access to the international criminal court, and one of the big issues has always been the israeli settlement building in the west bank, which, of course, is seen
united nations to take control of the internet? jon: just in. new information out of egypt. reuters is reporting that egyptian president mohammed morsi has left the presidential palace after protesters fight with riot police outside the palace. of course he has been under intense pressure from his own people ever since he assumed autocratic powers and he has been engaged in a fight with the court system there. people have been very angry about what he has done. at any rate according to reuters he has left the presidential palace because of this, well, call them, demonstration, call them a mob. i'm not sure how you want to describe it but those are pictures outside the presidential palace in cairo. night has fallen there. we'll keep an eye on the situation. we have our steve harrigan there. we'll let you know as soon as we learn more. jenna: disturbing new signs al qaeda is on the rebound in parts of the middle east and after frica. the latest a large-scale al qaeda plot in jordan. they plan to hit deadly terror attacks in the capital and hit the u.s. embassy during the chaos. behind
outage since the fight began about 19 mobs ago. the head of the united nations said today conflict new and appalling heights of blew tattle and violence. he could have said that a year ago, frankly. now, fears that islamic extremists could try to take advantage of the chaos. and al qaeda inspired militant group tells the associated press joined the effort to topple the regime and determined to form a new islamic state. conor powell live in our middle east newsroom early this saturday morning. connor, what's the late word there? >> well, shepard, president assad and his supporters have managed to hold on to power despite the internal pressure domestically and international pressure on his regime. there are signs though who point to things being more shaky in sierra than we may have previously thought. in the past 24 hours. the damas tus international airport which had been firmly in control of the government has taken rebel fighter, mortars landed on the run way yesterday. the main road leading to the airport was closed for much of yesterday because of heavy fighting between rebels and
. you will see the united nations get -- get a united states shot on the arms control treaties that the united nations launch and they will supercede the constitution of the united states. that's where they're headed. >> oh, my god! >> this from the guy who sent weapons to the iranians, funding right wing death squads. and lied about it all. >> very glenn beckish right? going to be a world government. united nations is going to be -- you know, dictating american law and things like that. look, all of the crazy talk they did for the first four years and then we had election -- the american people said yeah, we like that guy. none of this is -- i think they're going to spin the tales for four more years because they sound, for that echochamber it sounds fun. >> stephanie: ben stein on o'reilly. >> a lot of angry, bitter people out there. they've got to attack something. so they attack christmas. they're not -- i don't consider them well in the head. >> what! >> nobody is being forced to bow down and worship anybody.
to the strong defense of his rumored frontrunner -- say that three times fast -- rumored front run ir, united nations ambassador, susan rice. >> susan rice is extraordinary. couldn't be prouder of the job that she's done. [applause] gwen: by the way, that was hillary clinton who started that round of applause around the cabinet table. but if they're applauding on capitol hill, they're doing it very quietly, as republican senators make their doubts known loud and clear. at issue -- rice's role in providing a preliminary and ultimately incorrect explanation of the circumstances surrounding the attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi, in libya, that resulted to the death of four americans including the u.s. ambassador. >> bottom line -- i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explanation about how four americans died in benghazi, libya, by ambassador rice, i think does not do justice to the reality at the time, and in hindsight clearly was completely wrong. but here's the key -- in real time it was a statement disconnected from reality. gwen: back to our original question,
-month period bradley manning was abused. the united nations has admitted this, a speciwhy was he treated way? h several were ordered to abuse him to get a confession. there's been no confession and that's the case that's going on now. and that case is a reflection in the decay of the rule of law. hillary clinton's spokesperson resigned over the issue. the entire quantico prisoner base was affected. it reflects serious problems within the military system. it has a feeling about accountability and unaccountability is flowing into other parts of our life. >> now i don't want to get into detail, i know you have a strong point of view, obviously on how bradley manning has been treated. but i didn't want to go down that path. i wanted to ask a question about something else you thought about him. you said what they were dog is perhaps to coerce him to get you involved in all of this. he could make a deal to serve limited time. and to make that deal, you could be the guy who loses out. are you worried that that could be the deal, he says this is what julian assange did to get the information so you cou
and finally, our ambassador of the united nation who appeared on every national sunday show has now said she gave false information concerning how this tragedy happened. >> think about this for a second. we knew all the details of the bin laden raid right away. why would it take ten weeks to figure out all of the details of the benghazi raid? think about this just for a second. the bin laden raid, for the record, was our raid. we planned it. america planned it. we knew all the details of it right away because it was our idea. america carried it out. the attack on the consulate in benghazi was not us, unless that's the next part of your giant cover-up conspiracy. different things, right? done by different people. there is obviously something else going on here, right? the purported concern here. what we are supposed to believe about this whole benghazi scandal, the purported concern is, i'm sorry for the language. it is getting stupider and stupider by the day to the point of being a really special kind of stupid by now. i will just say that on the other side of this, my personal cockamamy co
that the instrument that we are funding that we founded the united nations is giving the palestinian government what was you know able to win on the battlefield. the bigger issue is not just palestinian politicians and terrorists field emboldened but the iranian regime feels emboldened and that really is the player here. it's iran that supports hezbollah to the north but also hamas supplying it with funds, with training, with weapons. we're not doing anything either in washington or new york to really push back on that. >> gregg: clinton has not been getting a lot of criticism. i wonder about that. she has talked so much how many miles she has logged in countries she has visited. is that state craft? >> it's exact opposite. its photo op foreign policy rather than deal with political factors on the ground which is really what state craft is all about. it's been very important people going to very important meetings around the world and this is not just true on israel-palestinian, it's on iran, it's climate change and all these other crisis. it's a lot of photo op stuff and no real changing of factors
nations envoy. the united states doesn't have a presidential envoy to deal with this crisis. these are low-cost solutions. having that kind of international peace process that brings pressure to bear on the parties, rwanda supporting the rebels, uganda supporting the process, the government is creating problems in the east as well. they need to be preshed into looking at the root causes since this cycle of violence began. >> is there anything that people can link sometimes, you have people who are suffering, wars taking place in that area. >> yeah. thanks for asking for that because the link between all of us who buy these products, like laptops and cell phones, and the violence is congo is very direct. it's sourced from the congo. so a major international effort has -- is under way just like the blood diamonds movement a decade and a half ago for sierra leonne and trying to drive that international market, that supply chain to be a more peaceful and legally developed. so that's really the objective. join up in some of those international efforts, go on raisehopeforco raisehopeforco raiseh
or the united nations jurisdiction over the init internet period. the use is in support of the web neutrality but the conference in dubai raises a specter of nations including iran, china, russia and others agreeing to live under the u.n. rules, what critics call restrictions. while the u.n. --. pardon me. while the u.n. maintains this is not about controlling the u.n. the critics say it is part of a red drip, drip regulation that will chip away internet freedom. >> even if internet freedom escapes this conference in dubai, this is just a stepping steen from countries like china, russia and other arab states they have been patient for the last 10 years and several years going forward they will continue to be persistent. >> reporter: the u.s. has a sizable delegation in dubai, about 1650 people. in simple terms they want internet regulation off the table and want the u.n. body to stick to networks already regulated so the telecommunications networks, phone networks but just leave the internet neutral if that is at all possible, jenna. jenna: we'll see what comes out of this conference. catheri
the information that he gave before the united nations that led us into the iraq war? did that make colin powell unfit to be secretary of state or was colin powell given bad intel? i never heard him say that. i never heard lindsey graham say that. >> condoleezza rice. >> same thing with condoleezza rice. she gave bad information to congress, not just to a sunday morning talk show. to congress. to congress. >> how can you say these three people we saw on video, lindsey graham, kelly ayotte and senator john mccain are not jumping into an intelligence debate for political reasons because they did not speak up at other very key times, even perhaps more significant times in -- >> we get the point. i think we all agree. maybe there are people out there across america who are saying, you know what we really need, we really need people to fight hard night and day to sidetrack secretary of state potential candidate because of some things she said on -- maybe there's people out there. i don't know where they are because i've never met them but do want to know this. like what's their long game, willie? wha
-assad in syria may resort to using chemical weapons on his own people. in the meantime, the united nations is hint thag there wil hinting that there will be no asylum for bashar al-assad as the syrian dictator makes it clear that he will die before leaving the country under any circumstances. what is going on behind the scenes, for that we turn to corn powell following all the latest developments from our mideast bureau in jerusalem. connor. >> reporter: the international and internal pressure is mounting on bashar al-assad today. secretary clinton reiterated her comments that the use of chemical weapons is a red line for the united states and that there would be consequences. we are also hearing that bashar al-assad is beginning to look for asylum around the world. he is reaching out to world leaders in latin america, particularly cuba, ecuador and venezuela. not on the list of places is russia and iran his two biggest military backers. this is all coming as the internal pressure on the bashar al-assad regime seems to b to be mounting. rebel fighter are moving closer and closer to damascu
an extraordinary good job as ambassador to the united nations. >> the assistant majority leader of the not dick durbin joining us this morning. nice to see you this morning. >> thank you, soledad. >> still ahead on "starting point," bad news for a nation obsessed with bacon. god, bad news. christine bad news for us. the majority of the pork that you're eating is contaminated. we'll update you on a really disturbing study that's coming up next. ♪ [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hunger by visiting drivetoendhunger.org. i(announcer) when subaru owners look in the mirror, they see more than themselves. so we celebrate our year-end with the "share the love" event. get a great deal on a new subaru and 250 dollars goes to your choice of five charities. by the end of this, our fifth year, our total can reach almost 25
to the united nations. and of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. >> today, republican senators continued to try to open up the massachusetts senate seat that scott brown could run for. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> if the president wants an easy confirmation hearing and process, nominate john kerry, who is imminently qualified to be secretary of state and i believe he would sail through in the nominating process. >> joining me now, ari mel ber. ari, you're coming to us tonight from kerry country, boston and i've got to think this is a horrible moment for senator kerry. you don't want to be the guy who gets praise from the mindless attackers of susan rice. >> yeah, i don't think he wants any part of this very weird b m boomerang play the republicans are trying to practice. he knows her well because as chairman of foreign relations committee, he oversees the state department, looking at the diplomacy and ambassadors and working with secretary clinton and ambassador rice. >> well, t
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